Grade 11



Curriculum Guide

English

6 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

World Literature

A main goal of study in Grade 11 is to broaden students’ literary understanding by examining a variety of themed units including Postcolonialism, Emotional Writing, and Magic Realism. Each unit will involve an investigation of culture as represented in literature, media, and non-fiction from around the world. Students read widely and deeply and are asked to consider not only the literary features of the texts but the ways in which cultures communicate. Writing is also emphasized, with occasions for students to develop their academic essay styles in forms such as the literary analysis and personal response. The final assessment for the year is either a fully developed literary analysis or personal response essay.
Texts studied include: A selection of short stories and poems, Anthology of Non Western Literature, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress by Dai Sajie, Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel, Write For College

Advanced Placement Language and Composition

AP Language and Composition is a course in rhetoric designed to prepare students to read analytically and write effectively in university and in life. Over the course of the year, the class will study a variety of prose from various periods with attention to rhetorical structures, modes, strategies, argumentation, and voice. Nonfiction genres receive particular emphasis in this course. Close reading and rhetorical analysis of effective writing will serve to introduce a broad range of composition assignments calling for the use of various rhetorical modes, persuasive strategies, stylistic devices, and tones. Students will learn to confidently evaluate their own writing as they strengthen their rhetorical range and control. Because this course will culminate in a rigorous examination that could lead to college credit, the expectations are particularly high.

Mathematics

5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Students will be placed in one of the following courses depending on their level of performance in Grade 10 and teacher recommendation.

Algebra 2 / Statistics

This course has been developed to provide a balance of the three key areas of Algebra, Problem-Solving, and Statistics. It offers Grade 11 students the opportunity to build upon their knowledge of Algebra, to strengthen their skills in Problem-Solving, and to gain a broad foundation in Introductory Statistics. This course is a good preparation for the SAT test, as well as for college mathematics. After consultation with their teacher, students may continue with the Senior Math course or with AP Statistics in Grade 12.

Precalculus

Students who have already reached a good level of achievement in Algebra 2 and Trigonometry topics in their Grade 10 courses will be placed in Precalculus, in preparation for studying Calculus in Grade 12. Good achievement in this course would give them the opportunity of taking AP Calculus at the AB level or AP Statistics in Grade 12, in addition to being well prepared for SAT Math Subject tests and university mathematics courses.

Assessment and Grading: For these courses, assessment is carried out on a regular basis and the level of individual student progress is derived from a wide variety of sources. Students should expect to complete homework daily. The end of year examination counts for 20% of the final grade.

AP Calculus AB

This course is available for students who have reached an excellent level of achievement in Algebra 2 and Trigonometry topics in their Grade 10 course. This accelerated and demanding course covers all the topics required for the Advanced Placement Calculus examination at the AB level. It is expected that each student will work toward a deep understanding of the subject material so as to be able to apply it to her university studies.

The time needed for homework will vary from topic to topic and from student to student. Willingness to ask questions when something is not fully understood will facilitate getting homework done more accurately and efficiently. As the year progresses, this AP course, as compared with lower level mathematics courses, will have longer-term homework assignments that will allow for, and require, careful balance with other time commitments.

Assessment and Grading: Assessment is modeled on AP and university expectations, including challenging questions and an adjusted marking scale. Students who complete the AP Calculus AB Exam will study additional preparatory topics in May, but will not have an end-of-year school examination.

Science

SCIENCE (Electives): 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Two science credits are needed to graduate from the Sacred Heart. A student who passes Biology, Chemistry and Physics in Grades 9 and 10 will have already obtained three science credits. (Any student who arrived at the Sacred Heart in the middle of Grade 9 or 10 should check her credit status.) We recommend continuing with some science in to grades 11 and 12 even if this minimum credit requirement has been met. Continuing science provides breadth of experience, and keeps options open for college. Students wishing to study science, medicine or engineering at university should find out about the relevant university entry requirements before making their course selections. All our courses present science as a field of enquiry rather than just as a body of knowledge. Thus, the courses emphasise the development of the skills of scientific investigation as well as the acquisition of knowledge and the understanding of scientific concepts. The Pre-AP and AP subjects are higher-level courses and as such the time commitment for homework and assignments may be larger than a standard course. The time needed for homework will vary from topic to topic and from student to student. During the latter parts of these courses, in preparation for the AP exams, the assignments and course workloads will be higher as a deep understanding of the material is required on this task.

Grade 11 (or 12): 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Biology (Pre-AP): Entry subject to teacher recommendation

This course emphasises topics such as Biochemistry, Cell Structure, Respiration, Molecular Genetics (DNA etc), Mendelian Genetics and Evolutionary Mechanisms. It provides students with the factual knowledge and analytical skills to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Practical work forms an important part of the course. It is appropriate for students who have a strong interest in biology, possibly with the aim of majoring in a biological or medical field in college. Students planning to take the AP Biology exam must take this course in G11 and then Advanced Biology in G12. However, it is equally suitable for a student who is simply interested in studying further biology. The course is suitable for those wishing to take the SAT Biology Subject test.

Chemistry (Pre-AP): Entry subject to teacher recommendation

This course is an introduction to general chemistry. Topics covered include: Fundamental Chemical Concepts, Chemical Formulae and Bonding, Atomic Structure, Moles and Reactions, Gases, Electrochemistry, Thermochemistry, Kinetics and Chemical Equilibrium Systems. Practical work and analysis is a vital part of this course. Any student who is thinking of majoring in science, medicine or engineering at college should consider taking this course. Students planning to take the AP Chemistry
exam must take this course in G11 and then Advanced Chemistry in G12. However, the course is equally appropriate for a student with an interest in Chemistry. This course is suitable for those wishing to prepare to take the SAT Chemistry Subject test.

AP Physics 1: Entry subject to teacher recommendation

This course covers the following main areas of Physics; Kinematics and Newton’s laws, Rotational Dynamics, Gravitation and Circular motion, Projectile motion, Momentum, Waves, and an introduction to Electricity. Practical work, including the use of computers for data collection and analysis, forms an important part of the course. For a grade 11 student, the AP Physics 1 examination will be taken at the end of grade 12 in conjunction with the AP Physics 2 examination should the student continue through and complete AP Physics 2. For a grade 12 student studying AP Physics 1 they will take the exam at the end of grade 12. Any student who is thinking of majoring in science, medicine or engineering at college should consider taking this course in G11 or G12. This course is suitable for those wishing to take the SAT Physics Subject test.

Grade 11 or 12: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Environmental Science

This course is for students with an interest in environmental issues, and for those who wish to study a broad course covering aspects of science, which have direct relevance to society. After completing this course students should be able to take part in well-informed discussion of such issues as Pollution, Population Growth, Recycling, Conservation and Energy use. In addition, current affairs issues related to environmental science may be studied. Class discussion of the issues forms an important part of the course, as does the development of research and presentation skills.

Grading:

For all the courses described above

Semester grade

  • 50% for unit tests
  • 50% for other class work and homework assignments (including laboratory reports, practice and review questions, data analysis exercises, short research papers, short oral presentations and essays)

Final grade for the year
Grade 11

  • 40% for each semester
  • 20% for the End of Year examination

Final grade for the year
Grade 12

  • 50% for each semester

Each student taking AP sciences will sit the external College Board AP examination at the end of the specified year.

Social Studies

Electives: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Ancient Civilizations

The Ancient Civilizations course will investigate the history and culture of major civilizations of the ancient world. We will look at the philosophies, people, places and events that have had a lasting impact on our world today. The course will ultimately aim to develop student’s knowledge and perspective of ancient civilizations in order to understand the contributions of the ancient world to modern society.

European History (AP) 1450 – 2000

We will study Europe from the Italian Renaissance through the breakup of the Soviet Union and the growth of the European Union. We will examine a number of themes such as:

  • Cultural history: major trends in literature and the arts, developments in scientific and philosophical ideas and practices, and changes in religious thought and organization.
  • Political history: the rise of the modern state system, the extension and limitation of human rights, colonization, imperialism, socialism, fascism, feminism, and human rights.
  • Social and economic history: the effects of disease, changes in medicine and hygienic practices, urbanization and the family, gender roles, industrialization, diet, and how changes in cultural values have affected social relationships.
  • Students should plan to allocate about five hours per week to prepare for class.

US History for College

This introductory course is designed for students who would like to attend college in the United States and who would like to know more about US history. This course covers American history from the colonial era to the election of President Obama. Topics include the formation of the United States, the causes and consequences of slavery, the modernization of America, the United States in international affairs, and the growing cultural diversity of the American people. Students will practice skills required for university study including framing a research question, essay writing and analyzing primary and secondary sources.

World History (AP)

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop a greater understanding of the evolution and interaction of human societies. We apply historical thinking skills and assess major themes in world history. The chronological time frame is ambitious from the Paleolithic era to present but the periodization and themes are clearly defined. We examine

  • The impact of trade, war, diplomacy and international organizations among major societies
  • The impact of technology and demography on people and the environment such as population growth and decline, and migration
  • The assessment of major social features such as social structure, gender structure, and the role of women in different societies
  • The changes in functions and structures of political power such as dynasties and the emergence of nation-states
  • The development of intellectual philosophies such as Confucianism and Taoism

Macroeconomics (AP)

Entry may have to be subject to a student's previous performance in mathematics.
There are two separate AP examinations for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics; therefore, each course may be taken either on its own or together with the other course in the same year. Alternatively, it is possible to take the two courses in consecutive years in either order, since each course is self-contained and sufficient for the relevant examination.
We shall set up and manipulate analytical models, based on simple diagrams, which can explain why there is unemployment or inflation in an economy, why countries trade with each other and how economic development can be pursued. Worksheets will be used so that students may actively participate in figuring out the models and in reaching conclusions about what fiscal and monetary policies governments should adopt in order to deal with economic problems. Since we can never be entirely sure how people will behave and whether our assumptions are correct, there is plenty of controversy about both policies and their outcomes. For example, we shall discuss whether or not taxation is beneficial for economic growth.

Microeconomics (AP)

Entry may have to be subject to a student's previous performance in mathematics.
There are two separate AP examinations for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics; therefore, each course may be taken either on its own or together with the other course in the same year. Alternatively, it is possible to take the two courses in consecutive years in either order, since each course is self-contained and sufficient for the relevant examination.
Why is the US government concerned about Microsoft’s monopoly power? Should public-transport systems be privatized or nationalized? In order to join in such debates, we need to be clear about the underlying assumptions, and to use models which analyze what is happening in different kinds of markets, especially with respect to production costs. We shall also discuss what happens, e.g. pollution, when the assumptions underlying the analyses break down. Our aim is to find out which systems maximize utility (welfare) and what can be done to minimize the adverse effects of such common market systems as oligopoly. Worksheets will be used so that students may actively participate in figuring out the models and in reaching conclusions about what will happen if, for example, a typhoon destroys the rice harvest.

International Relations

International Relations is designed to foster an understanding of how nations develop and prioritize foreign policy. Students examine a variety of topics including international relations and politics, the workings of international organizations and the United Nations, the arms race, terrorism, colonialism, neo-colonialism, nationalism, and foreign aid. Particular emphasis is placed upon Japan and its changing role in world affairs, and the USA & China as superpowers. Topics will be examined from the historical, social, economic and political viewpoints through selected foreign policy case studies.
Students will be required to do a variety of reading and writing assignments. Most importantly however, this course aims to give students a chance to discuss, debate, foster critical thinking skills, and practice the skills of diplomacy.
This course does not require an outside time commitment similar to AP History courses though students are encouraged to read widely and develop foreign policy analysis and foster political awareness.

Languages

FRENCH: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

The high school French language program in grades 11 and 12 provides the students with learning opportunities in the study of French language and society. A critical appreciation and analysis of French culture and texts are emphasized in all levels. Students will be placed in language classes according to teacher recommendation.

French Language

Students will be placed according to their proficiency in the four language skills. Students will learn and improve to read, speak and write about a variety of topics. Grammar, sentence structure and vocabulary are presented and integrated in dialogues, descriptions, short stories, poems, small plays, drill exercises, educational games, songs, as well as using video and Internet resources. Within the study of the language students will discover French culture, as well as other cultures included in the French speaking world known as La Francophonie. The levels taught are in line with DELF’s exams of French Ministry of Education.
Reference Book: Et Toi 1 Manuel + Exercise book. (A1 of CECR), Et Toi 2 Manuel + Exercise book. (A2.1 of CECR) or Et Toi 3 Manuel + Exercise book. (A2 of CECR), E-texts, The magazine Okapi

Advanced Placement French Language

The course is designed to have students understand and achieve a level of spoken and written French comprehensible to any native readers and speakers of the French language, in a variety of contexts authentic sources. It will allow students to become proficient in reading, writing, speaking and listening in preparation for the AP French Language Exam and for further studies of the language. The course content reflects intellectual interests shared by students and teachers: social current events, literature, sports etc. Assessment will be based on listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing skills developed in class and or through assignments and tests.
Reference Book: Allons au delà, Pearson Education 2012, Edito (B1 of CECR), La société française, Alma editions, 2007, French TV programs, French movies and dramas, E-texts, articles from French newspaper
Assessment: Tests, quizzes (oral and written), listening practice, reading, conversation in class, oral presentation, class participation, homework, end of year examination (not for students in Grade 11 AP and students in Grade 12 )

Intensive French (Electives)

In this one year course, students will learn to communicate in French, in a range of day to day situations, about a variety of topics and be able to comprehend and write short texts: letters, dialogues, descriptions, notes, blogs, videos etc. This course will provide the students with a solid basis in the 4 languages skills for further study of the French language. Within the study of the language students will also get to discover French culture, as well as other cultures include in the French speaking world known as La Francophonie.
Reference Book: Et Toi 1 Manuel + Exercise book. (A1 of CECR) or Et Toi 2 Manuel + Exercise book. (A2.1 of CECR)
Assessment: Tests, quizzes (oral and written), listening practice, reading, conversation in class, oral presentation, class participation, homework, end of year examination (not for students in Grade 12)

JAPANESE: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

International School of the Sacred Heart offers two Japanese programs: Japanese as a Second Language (JS-for non-Japanese speakers) and Japanese as a First Language (JF-for Japanese speakers). Students will be placed in language classes according to teacher recommendation.

Japanese as a Second Language

This course is for students who would like to learn Japanese as a Second Language. Students are placed in different levels according to their language ability. The aim of this course is for students to acquire sufficient competence in Japanese to meet their communicative needs, to gain knowledge and appreciation of Japanese culture and to enjoy using the language so that they may become lifelong learners. Students will acquire sufficient competence in Japanese by developing all four skills:
listening; speaking; reading and writing. Classroom activities include oral, reading, writing, role-play, skits, interviews, essays, journals, projects, presentations, etc.
Assessment: Unit tests (oral and written), quizzes (oral and written), kanji, essays, homework, oral presentations (skit, speech, interview, presentation and oral work in class), class participation

Advanced Placement Japanese Language and Culture

The course is offered to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam.
Assessment: Interpretive communication skill (Reading and Listening Comprehension), interpersonal communication skill (Text Chat and Conversation), presentational communication skill (Compare and Contrast Article, Cultural Perspective Presentation), kanji

Japanese as a First Language

This course is designed for native Japanese speakers and follows the Japanese language curriculum program used in the Japanese schools. Students follow a balanced program, which incorporates development in the four language skills. Students develop critical thinking, linguistic sensibility and sensitivity through reading of fiction and nonfiction, appreciating poetry and writing on varied topics. Kanji skill is developed as well as relevant and accurate expressions in writing and speaking. Students are given the opportunity to connect with their own experience and to foster a positive attitude to Japanese culture and other cultures. Teachers use varied methodology in class and students are placed in levels according to their language ability.
Assessment: Unit tests, quizzes, kanji, essays, homework, oral presentations (skit, speech, interview, presentation and oral work in class), projects and class participation.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Our ESL Program

Our program aims to help students who are not used to learning in English. The ESL teachers provide courses that help students to refine their academic English language skills, using materials from the mainstream classes to further support proficiency and understanding. We focus on developing all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), but our main aim is to help students to read and write a range of academic texts such as narratives, recounts, procedures, explanations, research
reports and literary essays.
Assessment: A student’s growth in English is monitored on a regular basis through reading journals, weekly diaries, vocabulary tests and a variety of oral, reading and written tasks. Effort and in-class participation are also important criteria in the assessment of progress.
Once a student has acquired a level of competency that allows her to function in the content areas along with her peers, she will transfer from the program to take either Japanese or French.

Creative and Performing Arts

Electives: 5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Art

Art
This course offers the opportunity to work in many areas of art including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and design. It provides a strong foundation for students who intend to study art, design or architecture in the future. In the first semester students complete a variety of teacher directed activities and in second semester, under teacher guidance, work on projects of their own choosing. This provides the opportunity for in depth exploration of concepts that are of interest to them.

Pre AP Studio Art - 2D Design
This course is for students who intend to submit their portfolio for AP evaluation at the end of grade 12. It requires a high degree of motivation and the willingness to put in extra time as approximately 12 pieces of work need to be completed (6 for Breadth and up to 6 for Concentration). The first semester will focus on projects for the Breadth requirements of the programme and the second semester working on pieces for their Concentration.

3D Design

Pre AP Studio Art - 3D Design
Students are based in the pottery room but also work with a variety of other materials such as metals, wood, plastics and glass to create a series of pieces which they will submit for the ‘Breadth” section of the A.P. 3D Design Portfolio. Each student will be taught how to successfully photograph their work and create an online digital portfolio which will eventually be sent to the College Board to be assessed in May of their senior year. The course revolves around interior, exterior and fashion design projects creating functional or abstract pieces which have a “sculptural feel” and use the principles of 3D Design. Contemporary art history, web research, gallery visits and visiting artists provide the stimulus for such design projects. This course is created for students who enjoy designing and making. The homework demands are light since there is a strong expectation that students will find out of class time to work in the studio further developing their studio portfolio. Students in grades 11 and 12 are also eligible for the High School Pottery sleepover workshop led by Master Potter Euan Craig. This workshop includes the now famous “Pottery Olympics” Team event!

Music

This course is for musically experienced or highly motivated students and builds a solid foundation for advanced study in all areas of music. Students work to refine their performing technique and compositional skills, to deepen their awareness of music history and theory, aesthetics, and the meaning of music in world cultures. The students work with advanced music software for orchestrating and arranging music. The students are introduced to experimental electronic music and electro-acoustic music. Performances are recorded and edited by the students themselves. A strong emphasis is put on sight-singing and keyboard harmony. The students have the opportunity to sit for the higher grade music theory examinations of the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music.


Food Technology

In this practical based subject students will learn about food science and nutrition, food safety and hygiene, the processes and skills needed to make foods into edible products, and how new food products are developed and marketed. An introduction to the hospitality industry will also be covered. Key skills and knowledge will be gained through a wide range of cooking, demonstration and research activities.

Media

5 periods per week - One Year - One Credit

Introduction to Computer Programing

“I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer...because it teaches you how to think.” - Steve Jobs, Founder Apple Computer Inc.

Computer programming is the art and science of turning computers from expensive doorstops into powerful tools. This course covers the basics of computer programming and will serve as a foundation for further learning in this area. It is designed for students with no prior programming experience. The course will cover abstract concepts such as variables, data types, loops, conditionals, and various data structures, among others which can be applied to almost any programming language. Students will learn how to think like a programmer and how to control this powerful technology.

“Do we direct technology, or do we let ourselves be directed by it, and those who have mastered it?” - Douglas Rushkoff, Author of “Program or Be Programmed”

Values

2 periods per week (2 semester courses per year) - One Year - ½ Credit

Action for the Blind

This is a practical program in contact with the direct needs of blind people. The students are privileged to have a visually handicapped visitor to the class each week to proof-read the students’ Braille work. Students learn Braille either in English or Japanese. They experience a guided ‘blind-walk’ with the use of an eye mask, collect stamps, and engage in and initiate other activities. They learn about the lives and needs of the blind and meet individuals who have seeing-eye dogs and who share their experiences of being blind in today’s society.

Ethics

This course encourages students to consider questions of morality. It gives students an overview of the Philosophy of Ethics looking at and critiquing ethical theories from Philosophers such as; Immanuel Kant, Aristotle, Bertrand Russell, Peter Singer and A.J. Ayer. We then move into looking at applying these theories and the students’ own ideas to modern Ethical Theories. The students can pick these topics and they generally include things such as; animal rights, Euthanasia, abortion and capital punishment.

Introductory Psychology

Students gain a general introduction to the field of Psychology and are able to develop a deeper understanding of the world around them, for example why people may behave differently when in a group. They are also given opportunities to learn about themselves and different techniques which can benefit their studies in other subjects, such as memory techniques and studying methods based on their personality. The topics studied are: Social influence, Brain and memory and Personality.


Prayer and Meditation

Students take time to reflect, pray, and learn to center their lives in a quiet and spiritual atmosphere. Students are encouraged to think about their personal values and goals and to find a way of returning, through meditation, to the essential elements of their lives.

Refugees and Human Rights

This course defines the conditions of those suffering from systemic human rights’ abuses and those with refugee status in the world today. The reasons why certain groups are in these categories will be discussed, and students will be responsible for projects which will lead to a better understanding of what they, as individuals, can do to be a part of the solution to refugee crises in the 21st century. The course also examines the sources of Human Rights abuses in the world as well as organisations and individuals involved in promoting Human Rights.

Theory of Knowledge

2 periods per week - One Year - ½ Credit

The aim of the TOK course is to question the basis of knowledge. How do we know what we know? How do we justify our claims to know something? Students will critically reflect on the methods that we use to gain knowledge and how they are used in different disciplines. They should come to appreciate the strengths and limitations of the various ways in which we justify knowledge. Students will discuss whether there is such a thing as certain knowledge, or whether knowledge must
always be uncertain and relative. They should become more aware of the personal, ideological and cultural biases that affect the way people view the world. Most classes involve whole-class and/or small group discussions. Each student will be asked to write reflections on the ideas discussed in class. TOK is graded on an ESU system. The grade is based on written work and class participation. Passing TOK is a graduation requirement.

Personal Education

1 period per week - One Year - ¼ Credit (Compulsory)

The personal education program focuses on developing self-awareness, self-confidence and a sense of personal responsibility. It concentrates on the skills of working with and relating to others, and coping with the changing society in which we live. It explores a range of issues that relate to our physical, social and emotional well being, and tries to address issues of concern to students.